Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorMcLean, Thomas
dc.contributor.advisorRogers, Shef
dc.contributor.authorDobson, Judith Patricia
dc.date.available2019-04-09T21:24:51Z
dc.date.copyright2019
dc.identifier.citationDobson, J. P. (2019). Literary Sophias: The Esoteric Female in Romanticism (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/9233en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/9233
dc.description.abstractThis thesis explores the Romantic representation of femininity in relation to elements of the Western esoteric tradition. In particular, it discusses the presence of Gnostic themes and gender imagery and the ways in which Romantic writers incorporated these concepts into their works as a means of articulating discourses that could challenge mainstream trends. I propose that Romantic writers engaged with an image of the feminine that elevated the female within the epistemological hierarchies of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, and whose precedents lie in the traditions of Gnosticism and other esoteric schools of thought. This feminine image resurfaced within dissenting movements like the Moravians, Behmenists and Swedenborgians, who emphasised the feminine aspects of God and creation. During the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, these movements, and the ideas they espoused, became intertwined with apocalyptic concepts which entailed the spiritual renewal and the betterment of humanity, and in which the feminine was a central component and catalyst. These concepts acquired greater socio-political significance during and post-Revolution and, within this socio-political climate, Romantic writers challenged the binary constructions of gender and epistemological hierarchies. This thesis demonstrates the ways in which Romantic writers—S.T. Coleridge, William Blake, Mary Shelley, Percy Bysshe Shelley, and the transitional figure, Elizabeth Barrett Browning— incorporated alternative religious representations of gender into their writings in ways that subverted established discourse, depicting the feminine as a source of spiritual wisdom and creative transcendence, a mode of representation that mirrors such figures as the Gnostic Sophia.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectRomanticism
dc.subjectgnosticism
dc.subjectColeridge
dc.subjectBlake
dc.subjectShelleys
dc.subjectEBB
dc.subjectTheology
dc.subjectwomen
dc.subjectfeminism
dc.subjectpoetry
dc.subjectFrankenstein
dc.subjectesotericism
dc.titleLiterary Sophias: The Esoteric Female in Romanticism
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2019-04-09T00:38:15Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglish and Linguistics
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
otago.openaccessOpen
 Find in your library

Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record